https://www.yahoo.com/health/seeing-how-the-brain-responds-to-hugs-could-lead-104168308312.html

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Thanks to new research, we may be able to see autism in the same way we see a broken ankle on an X-ray. (Photo by Getty Images)

Psychiatric disorders – including autism – are currently diagnosed based on a clinical behavioral assessment, a process that’s highly nuanced and highly subjective.

To assess for autism in toddlers include, parents are asked: “If you point at something across the room, does your child look at it,” and “does your child play pretend or make-believe?” Anyone with a young child knows that these types of general questions are very difficult to conclusively answer.

But now, Carnegie Mellow University researchers have created a potentially decisive way to diagnose autism— and other psychiatric disorders — with 97 percent accuracy: By examining how our brains respond to the thought of a hug.

This makes a lot of sense to me. Combine a disorder of prediction with a sensory integration dysfunction and it would be very anxiety-provoking.

 

New Hypothesis Posits Autism as Disorder of Prediction | Psych Central News.

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But that’s the problem with this whole autism business; we want precisely what is not available to us — something definitive, like a cause, a cure. Enough, already, with the ambiguities, the gray zones.

 

Still, it was definitiveness that was worrying me when I began reading “The Kids Who Beat Autism,” Ruth Padawer’s cover story in the Aug. 3rd New York Times Magazine. Mainly, I didn’t want to discover all the things my wife, Cynthia, and I could have done and didn’t. That thought keeps me up enough nights as it is.

via The Kids Who Don’t Beat Autism – NYTimes.com.

Joel Yanofsky’s reaction to the recent New York Times Magazine article on The Kids Who Beat Autism strikes a chord within me, the familiar angst among parents of autistic children: Could we have done better? Did we miss something that could have helped? What if we didn’t have the time/resources/energy to do ABA (something that did not become widespread until later)? Could our child have been among the approximately 10% who “recover” from autism??

Some people would say that Rob is among that 10%. He is certainly “indistinguishable” from the non-autistic population in casual interaction, but he has some social deficits that become more obvious in extended and/or repeated interactions, and that affect his ability to hold certain types of jobs. Could any of this have been helped if he had been diagnosed earlier, and if he had been given intensive ABA treatment? It is hard to say. We feel fortunate that he is highly functional. But I would not say that he has outgrown, recovered from or “beat” his autism. The ambiguity of the diagnosis makes it difficult to assess his recovery.

Rob was not diagnosed until about two months before his sixth birthday. He was not withdrawn into his own little world so much, as he was hyperactive, aggressive, destructive, obsessive, and socially inept in our world. He was verbal, could make eye contact (although he didn’t like to), and we were more concerned about his aggression and destruction than anything else. We concentrated on intensive sensory integration therapy, and the therapies through his school: speech therapy, physical therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy (although not as intensive as ABA).

Rob still has fine motor issues that are very particular (he is a graphic designer, and can draw using a mouse; but not a pencil or pen; his writing is still pretty illegible, even his printing). His gross motor skills are excellent, and he is very athletic. He is intelligent and highly verbal, but still finds social interaction to be stressful. He tends to go into social or psychological “defense mode” easily, still; but at least it is no longer accompanied by physical defense mode as well. He has had some success in community college. He has had some success in work, along with some failures.

If we had to do it over again we would certainly have tried ABA if he had been diagnosed young enough. I think by age six it may have been too late, however. For Rob, I still think the best thing was the sensory integration therapy, because until those issues were addressed it would have been difficult for him to focus on anything else. But I am not an expert, only a parent who tried to do her best in a highly ambiguous situation.

 

Depending on your genetic makeup and a host of other variables, you’ll have a different reaction to stressful events from the people around you, and even your relatives. Some people naturally get energized by the challenge, even if it’s a frightening or intimidating one, and can’t wait to overcome it. Others feel dwarfed by the stress and just want to hide from it – this is called depression. Researchers and psychologists have long tried to tease apart why people have such different reactions to stress, and now a new study offers more clues about what’s going on in the brain to explain this difference in people’s responses.

Study Shows Why Stress Triggers Depression In Some, Resilience In Others – Forbes.

 

Wow. Just wow.

Brain Study Suggests Autism Starts Before Birth – NBC News.com.

 

New chair design might be a help to kids with autism.

fox13now.com

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SALT LAKE CITY — On Monday morning a special donation from a company called Safco came to Spectrum Academy, a school that teaches children with autism.

Cheering children welcomed in 18 Runtz chairs into their classroom. The chairs help students control their wiggles.

Jacqueline Whitaker has been teaching children with autism at Spectrum Academy for four years. She knows that it’s not always easy to get the kids to sit still.

“They have a hard time sitting, staying in their seat, staying on task because of their vestibular needs,” Whitaker said. “Their need for balance and knowing where they are in space.”

Last September Brian Culley, vice president of Office Products Dealer, bought one of these chairs for his son with autism. He noticed a significant difference – and encouraged spectrum academy to give the chairs a try.

“These chairs really stabilize them and get them more…

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This is a really interesting idea, and seems as if it would be very appealing. 

 

Researchers believe they have developed a psychological technique that improves the mental wellbeing of children with autism – through an activity that invents tiny characters the kids can then imagine are in their heads helping them out with their thoughts.

via ‘Wellbeing improved’ if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers – Medical News Today.